Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Hobby Pro tip

by TheGraveMind


Pro tip #1; Let the glue dry.

Simple really, and yet I've done it twice on the same project. I start painting, and the glue gives. Now I have wet paint on a piece that I can't handle that I need to glue back together. Sigh.

On the topic of glue, which kind do you use? and what for?
For basing a model I use Elmers and an old paintbrush to spread it around.
For assembling models for me it is Krazy glue (super glue) because they make a gel version that is so much easier to use. I love the gel because it doesn't immediately run and you can even glue upside-down easily.

Some people have said they use Plastic glue. I've used it before, but one mistake and the bond is permanent, and more likely the plastic piece will break before the glue gives. also doesn't work with resin/metal, so you're using super glue anyways.

It has been mentioned that Wood glue and/or hot glue works well when assembling terrain pieces. I haven't tried either of those yet.

So comment below, what is your favorite glue? How long does it take to dry? What do you use it for?

6 comments:

  1. This really is a good tip and although many people know it few people do it.

    I am a cronic non waiter, I am very impatient but after a lot of glue weakening disasters I think I am learning. I used to use superglue for everything because I thought plastic glue took too long to dry!

    I do like superglue as long as you are careful that you get a good bond, I hate bits that are so well glued they can't be pulled apart, what if part way through I want to change something? with plastic glue you can't

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  2. You can tear apart pieces joined with plastic glue. Just don't glob it on the joints. Small dabs create a seal while still allowing you options later...plus it dries quicker.

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  3. I use Zip glue...but unfortunatly, I'm one of the ones who get cold like symptoms for a week after I've glued a squad together and had even a whiff of the glue fumes,even otuside. (It's like a painter being allergic to a paintbrush). Sux ass, cause I've got so much moding to do.....

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  4. i use a glue called Liquid Poly (it is a liquid form of plastic glue with a needle-point applicator). it allows extremely accurate placement of small amounts of glue, and it doesn't stick instantly, which allows re-placement and posing of the model until you get a really good one. additionally, when it does dry, it basically forms a single piece of plastic, so the damn think wont shatter when you drop it, like superglue does.

    i always wait at least a day before undercoating, and then another 12 hours before painting.

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  5. As I read this I am actually waiting for the glue on some bases I just sanded to fully dry. Patiently.

    As for which glues I use, well, I use the glue that is appropriate for the job.

    For mixed media models, like metal to plastic, and resin, I use super glue, and pin the joints.

    For plastic models, I use liquid plastic cement. Holding the parts in place I apply it with a brush and tack it in place. If the part is misaligned, it can be separated because there is a working time and the tacks are small. If the part is properly placed, I then apply slightly more glue to the join, letting capillary action do the work. And with careful application of pressure and additional glue, you can simulate weld lines in tanks, or even fill minor gaps.

    For sand and flock bases, and most terrain building I use PVA glue, watered down. When the sand is drying, I then saturate the sand with water, then put a drop of more watered down PVA glue into the saturated sand, and it flows through the sand like quicksilver using capillary action again. The bond is incredibly strong and there is never any loose sand.

    For larger terrain projects, I may even use industrial adhesives, like Liquid Nails, to bond foam without melting it, etc.

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  6. I use the GW super-glue. I used to use the "Super Glue" but I realized that the GW super-glue was better value. It came with more glue, and the bottle didn't jam up as much.

    I also use 2-part epoxy for some metal joins, particularly when they are heavy. Epoxy is a bit more difficult to use, and more temperature sensitive than super-glue.

    I also use a plastic glue (solvent), by Tamiya. I brush it on, wait a sec, and then join. I find that for vehicles, this is the best glue.

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